“Whenever anybody wanted to do something new, they wanted to do it in TransWorld.” — Tony Hawk

 

(continued from page 1) wanted to do something new, they wanted to do it in TransWorld. For me, it was a forum to show the new stuff I was doing and voice my opinion, talking about what was happening. Throughout the years it’s been a staple of what the new big thing is and in a way that was more presentable to the general audience. It wasn’t so industry and underground that you didn’t understand it.

Not many people know that your dad, Frank Hawk, shot the very first cover. How did that come about?

Yeah, my dad shot the first cover of TransWorld. My
dad liked to shoot. Not that he wanted to be a photographer; he was just shooting at the Palmdale contest. Larry Balma, who started the magazine, also owned Tracker. I was sponsored by Tracker and my dad said, “Hey, I have great photos from that Palmdale event.” Larry went through the photos, and lo and behold, that became the cover.

Did you think action sports or skating would be as big as it is now?

No, I never thought it would. Not any of them: BMX, motocross…They were all just so niche and considered novelties and made fun of. I would get beat up when I’d show up anywhere with my skateboard.

Why do you think it’s accepted and more comfortable
now?

It’s a change of perception. Parents used to think of skating as rebellious. Nobody ever gave us our fair shake or understood the physicality, the passion, the attitude, and artistic elements of it. It was thought that these guys are destroying public property — they’re bad news. Once we had a forum, they saw that it’s amazing and athletic, and these guys are much more approachable than basketball players and baseball players. It was kids who were raised on MTV. They want action right away. You step on a skateboard and it’s on. You’re not waiting for someone to throw a pitch.

Images like this crossbone of Tony Hawk at the legendary Del Mar Skate Ranch are found only on the pages of TransWorld SKATEboarding and serve as photographic milestones of his journey to becoming one of the most prolific skateboarders of all time. PHOTO: BRITTAIN